Author Topic: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...  (Read 11686 times)

Marcus

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #75 on: Wednesday 28 April 2010, 10:35 »
Hello Martin,
What have you started here ? -  but some interesting submissions keep rolling in.It is obvious that most of us have extensive wish lists, so rather than start another thread, why not change the rules slightly to allow an ongoing wish list. As I stated in an earlier post, I, like most, can provide a different name every day. It will eventually peter out, but it does make interesting reading, with names many of us have never heard of, and one day who knows what will be revealed ? (Nicholl comes to mind already)
Without detracting from your original purpose, I am sure a few more names & suggestions will not muddy the waters too much.
Thanks anyway - you probably have enough to work with already !
Marcus.

thalbergmad

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #76 on: Wednesday 28 April 2010, 12:10 »
Nutters... ;)

There are probably people that think we are.

Anyway, I am off to play some Steibelt which is completely sane. I am attempting to record the Storm Rondo and perhaps one of the sonatas.

Great music.

Thal

Peter1953

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #77 on: Wednesday 28 April 2010, 13:12 »
Whatever happened to Hans Huber’s 2nd PC? I would love to see it recorded.
"Voyez mon ami, l'essentiel dans la musique c'est la mélodie" - Gioacchino Rossini

eschiss1

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #78 on: Wednesday 28 April 2010, 20:20 »
Whatever happened to Hans Huber’s 2nd PC? I would love to see it recorded.

There's a 2-piano reduction here:
http://imslp.org/wiki/Piano_Concerto_No.2,_Op.107_(Huber,_Hans)

No idea as to score or parts. But there's a start. (The 4th concerto in reduction is on the same site.)
Eric
Many of these opinions subject to change without further notice.

Ilja

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #79 on: Thursday 29 April 2010, 07:02 »
Whatever happened to Hans Huber’s 2nd PC? I would love to see it recorded.

There's a 2-piano reduction here:
http://imslp.org/wiki/Piano_Concerto_No.2,_Op.107_(Huber,_Hans)

No idea as to score or parts. But there's a start. (The 4th concerto in reduction is on the same site.)
Eric

I recall this issue being raised some years ago, with the conclusion that at least the concerto's orchestral score had been lost.

That is a pity, because particularly the 3rd concerto is one of my favourite in the genre - and really head above shoulders of anything else I know from Huber.
- Criticism is prejudice made plausible - H.L. Mencken

Gareth Vaughan

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #80 on: Friday 30 April 2010, 13:30 »
I think I recall Bo Hyttner telling me that the Full score and orchestral material of the 2nd PC of Huber is missing and that although there is extant a MS of the 4th PC it is in very poor condition with many pages missing so that reconstruction would take a long time and cost a lot of money, which is why Sterling have made no attempt (and have no plans) to try to reconstruct and record PCs 2 & 4.

Peter1953

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #81 on: Friday 30 April 2010, 13:41 »
I understand, but what can be the reason that the score of the orchestral material has disappeared? What happened with Huber’s legacy after his death?
Gareth, do you have any idea whether the scores of the VC and CC are still around somewhere?
"Voyez mon ami, l'essentiel dans la musique c'est la mélodie" - Gioacchino Rossini

Gareth Vaughan

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #82 on: Friday 30 April 2010, 17:41 »
The full score may never have been published and it would be quite usual for the orchestral parts to remain in MS, only the 2-piano score for pianists to practise being printed. Such MS items got lost regularly. A similar fate seems to have been suffered by Stavenhagen 2; Siboni; Moscheles 8 and numerous others. Quite often the composer made only a "short score" (i.e for solo instrument and piano, the orchestral parts being indicated in the 2nd piano part) and would conduct from this - so a full score was never, in fact, produced. This was the case with many concertos before about 1860.
Where MS material is concerned we are frequently dependent on the relatives of the composer for preserving his/her materials. Far too often they have been cavalier and careless with these precious items, sometimes deeming them of no worth and actually destroying them!
I don't know if the Cello Concerto exists still, but Bayerische Staatsbibliothek has a copy of the Piano/Violin score of the Violin Concerto Op. 40 (as, I believe has Library of Congress). The score was published by Schott of Leipzig in 1879 so that publishing house may have a copy in their archives. The 4th PC was published by Hug of Leipzig. As you know, so much wonderful music was lost in the bombing raids on that city in WWII.

oldman

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #83 on: Monday 03 May 2010, 00:03 »
The Rubenstein D Major Sextet has just become available at the IMSLP.

http://imslp.org/imglnks/usimg/5/5d/IMSLP63228-PMLP129041-Rubinstein_-_String_Sextet__Op._97__score_.pdf


Looks very interesting so far.

RoothamRVWFinzi

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #84 on: Monday 03 May 2010, 06:52 »
Hello All,

I have just joined this listing and after reading many discussion threads, I am very enthusiastic. Here are three musical pieces I would like to see make it to a CD recording - all by the British composer Cyril Rootham:

Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity (soprano, chorus and orchestra), the elegaic choral work Brown Earth and his Second Symphony.

I've got every recording of Rootham's work on CD (not a huge amount) and his music is both beautiful and stunning. There is just so much out there still to be recorded and discovered by the listening public....and I'm not just talking about Rootham here.....it is all very exciting!!!

albion

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #85 on: Monday 03 May 2010, 08:28 »
Yes, Cyril Rootham is certainly a composer who should be better represented on disc, although Richard Hickox's EMI collection is splendid, as is Vernon Handley's Lyrita account of the first symphony. In addition, the BBC holds important broadcast recordings which should certainly be more widely available:

Ode on the Morning of Christ's Nativity: Teresa Cahill, Philip Langridge, Michael Rippon, BBC Concert Orchestra and BBC Singers conducted by Vernon Handley (18th December 1975)

Symphony No.2 (Revelation Symphony): BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and Scottish Philharmonic Singers conducted by Vernon Handley (28th January 1984)

Marcus

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #86 on: Monday 03 May 2010, 12:41 »
I also have the Rootham symphony no1, and find it very rewarding. Apparently his Symphony no2 was fully sketched out with the help of friends and past pupils during his final illness in 1938, with the orchestration completed according to the composer's wishes by Patrick Hadley. It was given its first hearing by the BBC, (from the Maida Vale Studio) on 17/3/1939, conducted by Adrain Boult.
From a report at the time: "The second symphony contrasts strongly with the vigorous & genial 1st. It bears the signs of struggle, both physical & spiritual, the work of a man facing tragedy, with a high courage & faith. It culminates in a chorus of womens voices singing words from the Revelation of St.John, beginning with 'There shall be no more death' ." Hopefully one of the British recording labels will take it up.
Marcus.

edurban

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #87 on: Monday 10 May 2010, 00:09 »
Revilod, I could not agree with you more about the operas of Saint-Saens, especially Proserpine, Ascanio, L'Ancetre & Les Barbares (as Samson et Dalila, Henri VIIIHelene, La Princesse Jaune are all currently available.)  Good modern studio recordings of Etienne Marcel & Dejanire would also be nice.  Btw, I have an extra recording of Etienne Marcel in a French radio broadcast of a Montpelier opera production if you want it.  PM me, I only need a stamped envelope.  It's a very interesting piece, hardly worthy of Tchaikovsky's scorn...)

A website called House of Opera (try googling it) offers private recordings of a Radio France (I'm assuming, these things are always a little vague) 1957 broadcast of the comic opera Phryne, as well as Serge Baudo's performance of the 1911 grand opera version of Dejanire (excerpts only) from Lyon in 1985.  Phryne is in good sound, Dejanire only OK, but worth hearing...

It's amazing to me that we have so many Pacini and Mercadante operas in fine modern recordings (mind you, I'm grateful for them...) but so little Saint-Saens...

David

Alan Howe

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #88 on: Monday 10 May 2010, 05:49 »
Well, we only have Mercadante and Pacini because of Peter Moores - and he's a millionaire. At approx. £150,000 a throw, it's hardly surprising that recording opera is a hit-and-miss affair...

TerraEpon

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Re: Of all the unrecorded music in all the world...
« Reply #89 on: Monday 10 May 2010, 06:43 »
Saint-Saens also gets the short end of the stick with piano music. Much of it is only available on the horrible Vox set, with some of it in mono (1970s mono for god sakes!), an absolutely tepid version of Carnival, and hardly complete as advertised.