Author Topic: Chris Fifield's new book...  (Read 10388 times)

Balapoel

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #15 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 08:22 »
Ah, I understand. That period of course has interested me for some time, and I compiled a list for my own exploration. I tallied some 138 composers and 274 symphonies, mainly represented by German, French, English, Czech, Russian, and Swedish composers.

Gareth Vaughan

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #16 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 10:57 »
Quote
Jadassohn (Nos. 1-2)

Jadasssohn wrote 4 symphonies. These have been recorded (and are awaiting release) by CPO.

Aramiarz

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #17 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 14:45 »
Dear Alan
Interesting expresion: sung symphonist, excuse me the question, what is this? Some exemples?

Balapoel

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #18 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 16:47 »
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Jadassohn (Nos. 1-2)

Jadasssohn wrote 4 symphonies. These have been recorded (and are awaiting release) by CPO.

I know. I (like Chris) was only considering symphonies written between Beethoven 9 and Brahms 1...

And, I've been hearing about the CPO releases for about 4 years now...

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #19 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 17:03 »
"sung symphonist" = a recognised symphonist

Gareth Vaughan

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #20 on: Monday 13 October 2014, 17:43 »
Sorry, Balapoel. Misunderstood you.

eschiss1

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #21 on: Tuesday 14 October 2014, 02:45 »
Alan Howe:
"Chris avoided the sung symphonists..."

One can see Mr. Fifield doesn't completely avoid sung symphonists - just because many forum members can't abide Brahms' symphonies (I blame torturous, poor performances) doesn't make him an unrecognised symphonist :)

I do need to ask though- is Goetz Symphony No.2 his Symphony in F major (is he known to have written another before, and I'd forgotten- I seem to recall he'd written 2, but forgot the order...) - or is this a hitherto unknown or even-less-known symphony (maybe a little bit like Hans Huber's symphony A major symphony w/o number, composed between his Tell and Böcklin syms. ...)
"A cat, as I keep on saying, is also a cat for a' that..." - from Natsume Sōseki's Wagahai wa Neko de Aru (I Am a Cat, part 2 chapter 1)

Balapoel

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #22 on: Tuesday 14 October 2014, 04:16 »
Goetz's fragments:
Symphony (No. 1) in e minor (destroyed except for fragment) (1867)
Symphony (No. 2) in F major, Op. 9 (1873)

There's also sketches for a third piano concerto (in d minor, dating from 1876, the year he died).

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #23 on: Tuesday 14 October 2014, 08:00 »
The point about Chris' inclusion of Brahms 1 is that this is the terminus ad quem of the book...

eschiss1

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #24 on: Tuesday 14 October 2014, 13:56 »
Good point. I should have remembered Frisch's book on Brahms' symphonies in context (which I've only skimmed over at Google - though it's a natural candidate for me to try to borrow via interloan; it does seem interesting...) which includes just such a list (just a list, no music examples, though, still unusual even in including such a list!) of symphonies composed in the years before Brahms' 1st. It will be good to have some actual music to attach to some of those works some of which I've only heard of from skimming that list (or, as with Rosenhain, composers I do know -some- music by but whose symphonies are unknown territory to me, etc. ...) - hopefully a library near here will purchase a copy of your book once it's available :)
"A cat, as I keep on saying, is also a cat for a' that..." - from Natsume Sōseki's Wagahai wa Neko de Aru (I Am a Cat, part 2 chapter 1)

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #25 on: Tuesday 14 October 2014, 16:39 »
Frisch's book is well worth acquiring - as much for his account of how Brahms eventually became a symphonist as for his analysis of the symphonies themselves.

eschiss1

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 16 October 2014, 13:32 »
Was Markull's symphony ever published btw? I see a reference to a performance in manuscript in 1882, but I see no evidence of publication. There's a work of his called "Meisymphonie" but that seems to be a 4-page a cappella choral work :)
"A cat, as I keep on saying, is also a cat for a' that..." - from Natsume Sōseki's Wagahai wa Neko de Aru (I Am a Cat, part 2 chapter 1)

John H White

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #27 on: Friday 31 October 2014, 21:37 »
This is certainly a very impressive list, but why are Gade, Macfarren and Sullivan included in a survey of German symphonists?
Cheers,
     John.

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #28 on: Friday 31 October 2014, 22:43 »
The connection, I'm pretty sure, is Leipzig...
   

Alan Howe

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