Author Topic: Chris Fifield's new book...  (Read 10387 times)

eschiss1

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #75 on: Wednesday 27 January 2016, 03:21 »
Leaving out Austrian symphonists who wrote symphonies between 1830 and 1876 leaves out a few, though...

(Austrian composer Gottfried Preyer's first symphony in D minor, published 1839, does get a footnoted mention, as a subject of an anonymous (assumed by Fifield to be by Schumann) negative article in NZM (Fifield, p.6.))
"A cat, as I keep on saying, is also a cat for a' that..." - from Natsume Sōseki's Wagahai wa Neko de Aru (I Am a Cat, part 2 chapter 1)

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #76 on: Wednesday 27 January 2016, 09:34 »
While Emilie Mayer might have been worth a mention, so might many, many others. It's a question of where one stops, otherwise a book like this becomes more like a list. It may also have been my fault as I omitted to include Mayer when informing Chris about available recordings...

dwshadle

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #77 on: Wednesday 27 January 2016, 18:02 »
(Random fact side bar: the composer/critic Richard Storrs Willis, who wrote the tune for "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear," studied with Schnyder von Wartensee.)

Wieland

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #78 on: Tuesday 16 August 2016, 21:13 »
I received today my copy of Fifield's book and after having read 1 1/2 chapters I know that this is the book I was looking for for a long time. So thanks for bringing this book to my attention. I have just dug out my copy of Dahlhaus Music history of the 19th century which I never fully read and now I know why. There are way too many names missing in that book. And yes, it will require a lot of listening time to follow (as far as possible) all what Fifield wrote. In preparation of my vacation, I am currently loading many symphonies onto my ipod to take along with the book. ;D

Alan Howe

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #79 on: Tuesday 16 August 2016, 22:20 »
Frankly, I doubt whether Dahlhaus knew as much as we know now. Knowledge of the repertoire has increased hugely in the post-Dahlhaus era (he died in 1989), so his thesis is fatally out of date. Fifield is the new standard - and, if programme or 'characteristic' symphonies were included and the range expanded to encompass composers in the wider Austro-German tradition, the picture would be even fuller.

hyperdanny

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #80 on: Wednesday 25 October 2017, 12:00 »
I would just like to thank mr.Fifield for his books..I have owned the Bruch one for a couple years, and the "German symphonies" for a year or so, and they are invaluable to me.
Even if I cannot appreciate them in their totality (I don't read music, so I don't "get" the musical examples) they are so wonderfully written,  and they have added immeasurably to my appreciation of the UCs.
Only side-effect is exponentially increased expenditure on cd's , sometimes rare or out-of-print, but that's ok.

christopherfifield

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #81 on: Tuesday 16 January 2018, 23:01 »
I am most grateful for the positive responses which my book 'The German Symphony between Beethoven and Brahms' has elicited from members. My only regret is that the book is so expensive but I suspect the number of music examples is the reason, while the publishers probably target libraries rather than individual purchasers is another.  My best wishes for a happy and healthy 2018 go out to you all.

Mark Thomas

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Re: Chris Fifield's new book...
« Reply #82 on: Wednesday 17 January 2018, 08:05 »
Thanks. Your book is superb, a great and very informative read. Thoroughly recommended to anyone interested in the Unsung of the 19th century.